Special Products

Olive and Herbal Products

Olive and Herbal Products

These are some of the most famous and essential products of "Olive Island", Shodo Isalnd. The harvest produced by the warm climate and rich natural environment continues to grow, and in recent years herb cultivation has also started. In addition to olive oil, Shodo Island produces and sells a wide variety of cosmetics and food products made from olives and herbs.

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Somen (Japanese vermicelli)

Somen

The great taste of Shodoshima tenobe somen has made the region famous as one of the nation's top three producers of these noodles. Somen was first produced in Shodo Island in the 16th century, but 400 years later the traditional methods of preparation continue unchanged. Experience a taste of nature.

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Tsukudani (Fish or seaweed boiled in soy sauce)

Tukudani

Tsukudani production in Shodo Island began in 1945, directly after World War Two, and today the region vies for the top spot as the nation's leading producer of this specialty. Kelp from Hokkaido and seaweed from the Seto Inland Sea bring out the flavors of the island's pride and joy, its soy sauce. Shodo Island's tsukudani is known throughout the country, and continues to win high praise.

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Soy Sauce

Soy Sauce

Shodo Island's soy sauce industry was born roughly 400 years ago. With the painstaking selection of the best soy beans and wheat to use as ingredients, and with its careful production, have made Shodo Island's soy sauce one of the most famous in all of Japan. In recent years, new flavors have been produced to match the public's changing eating habits and tastes.

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Densyou-Giku

Densyou-Giku

Chrysanthemums were successfully grown in illuminated greenhouses for the first time in 1950. They have survived typhoons and other damage as work continues on introducing new types of flowers, adding to the greenhouses' 50-plus years of history. This is said to be one of the nation's three largest centers for the flowers, and consistently produces new varieties, earning it high regard from around the country. The view of the rows of houses, seemingly painted by the greenhouse lights, is positively breathtaking.

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Japanese Plum

Japanese Plum

In the West, plums are mainly eaten as dried fruit, but the Japanese Plum is of a different variety, and is eaten raw. Eating plums was recorded in the Kojiki, a historical text written in the early 8th century AD. The bittersweet flavor of early summer is trapped within, and can be enjoyed year-round in juice, wine or ice cream.

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